Printed from ChabadofBinghamton.com

FAQ's

FAQ's

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Frequently Asked Questions

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How active is Chabad on Campus?
What happens on campus for Jewish Holidays?
What about Shabbat?
Is there a Eruv encompassing Binghamton University?
Who comes to Chabad? Do you have to be religious?
Alright, but really, what kind of kids come to Chabad?
All this is great, but how do I join?Where are you located?
What does Binghamton offer in the way of Kosher food?
Is there a housing community I should prioritize, and can Chabad help me find a roommate?
Can Chabad assist me with obtaining a Mezuzah and Koshering my kitchen?
What is the story with religious services?
What happens if I don't know what to do at services or at a holiday celebration?
I just want to have fun, what can Chabad offer me?
I am interested in Social Action and Leadership, what can you tell me?
So how much time do I have to dedicate to Chabad activities?
But wait!! How much does it cost?
Who is who at Chabad?
If I am checking out Binghamton and want to come visit can you help me?
If my parents want to come visit where can they stay?
What does Chabad mean?

Q: How active is Chabad on Campus?

A: VERY! Operating since 1985, Chabad is easily one of the largest and most active groups on campus. Chabad provides Jewish students with an exciting, inclusive, joy filled community and non stop Jewish activity. There is something going on all day, every day and all night, every night at Chabad. Chabad serves the religious/spiritual/pastoral and educational needs of Jewish students as well as providing an outlet for some of the most cutting edge social and recreational activities on campus. Chabad provides open hearts and listening ears as well as crisis intervention and referrals in time of need. Chabad makes Shabbat and Jewish holidays come alive and brings the programming to a level where Jewish celebration becomes the focus rather than a detail of college life for many. Most importantly, Chabad is a home away from home; always there, always waiting, always accepting of those that come through its doors.

Q: What happens on campus for Jewish Holidays?

A: The Jewish community at Binghamton is privileged to always have school off for Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and the first two days of Pesach. If you live out of state and don't think you can get home for Rosh Hashana or Passover Seders, Chabad has you covered . You will always feel at home with us for any holiday you spend in Binghamton.

Chabad takes Jewish holidays to a whole new level! We offer warm, inclusive, easy to follow and inspirational Yom Kippur service and a break the fast. Sukkot is off the charts with holiday meals in our huge Sukkah (seats 400 comfortably), pop up sukkahs all around campus and our annual Jazzukah and Rib Festival. Our Simchat Torah Bash is legendary as are our Chanukah events, Purim Carnival Extravaganza and Seuda and Lag B'Omer Bonfire. In short, every Jewish holiday at Binghamton comes alive and is celebrated in high profile fashion. You will not feel homesick or lonely!

Q: What about Shabbat?

A: Shabbat at Binghamton is a surround-sound experience. Just follow the crowds and you will end up at Chabad for Friday night services and our famous home cooked, four course, dinner plus dessert buffet. Be prepared for the size of the crowd (300-400 students) and remember, each time you come back the room and the crowd seem smaller.

What else? Chabad offers Shabbat morning services, lunch and Seuda Shlishit.

What else? Join an Oneg on Friday night. Hang out with friends and enjoy the game room on Shabbat afternoon. Catch a Torah class. Just chill.

Q: Is there a Eruv encompassing Binghamton University?

A: Yes! You can read all about it (and more on observing Shabbat on campus) by clicking here

Q: Who comes to Chabad? Do you have to be religious?

A: Absolutely not! Chabad is a place for all Jews regardless of their affiliations or ties. Most of the students who come to Chabad are not “religious”, some come with more and some with a little less Jewish education, and others with none at all. One of the exciting things about Chabad is that there are so many different types of activities and so many different types of people that participate.

Q: Alright, but really, what kind of kids come to Chabad?

A: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, Grad Students, Liberals and Conservatives, Greeks and Geeks, Party Animals and Book Worms, Introverts and Extroverts, Sephardim and Ashkenazim. Students on campus and students from off campus.

Any Jew that moves!

Q: All this is great, but how do I join?Where are you located?

A: Joining Chabad is simple! Just come on by. If you’re Jewish you already belong! To join our mailing list just click here. We are located a few minutes away from campus at 420 Murray Hill Rd.

Q: What does Binghamton offer in the way of Kosher food?

A: There is a full service Kosher Korner located in the C4 Dining Hall operated through the Sodexo campus dining services and a part of their meal plan. The Kosher Korner is open Sunday-Fridays and serves dairy breakfast and lunches; dinner is meat. Plus, most on-campus dining hall features a Kosher Korner serving packaged sandwiches and salads that can be purchased on the regular university meal plan.

If you are in the mood for something really delicious:
Chabad Cafe / Pizza Shop at Chabad (Mon. & Thurs. 5:30-7:30pm during school semesters) Metroplis Deli at Chabad
(Tues. 5:30-7:30pm during school semesters)
For those living off campus, kosher meat and other basic products can be found in the following local supermarkets:
Price Chopper, Wegmans, Weis , Walmart

Q. Is there a housing community I should prioritize, and can Chabad help me find a roommate?

A. Many Jewish students request the all new Newing/Dickinson complex which is the closest housing community to Chabad and includes the Kosher Korner.

Chabad does maintain an on line interactive housing board through which lots of students have found their roommates ( and life long friends).

Q: Can Chabad assist me with obtaining a Mezuzah and Koshering my kitchen?

A: Living away from home at a public university can make Jewish observances challenging. Click here for all kinds of resources to make living on campus Jewishly easier and more meaningful, including obtaining a Mezuzah, Koshering your kitchen and more.

Q: What is the story with religious services?

A: Chabad holds daily minyanim Shacharit ( 7:30am) Mincha and Maariv ( depending on shkia) as well as services Friday night, Shabbat morning and on all Jewish holidays.

Q: What happens if I don't know what to do at services or at a holiday celebration?

A: Don't worry, everyone is learning and one has to start sometime, and what better place than at Chabad? There is always someone willing to help you.

Q: I just want to have fun, what can Chabad offer me?

A: Plenty! Apple picking in the Fall and a Skit Trip in the Winter, Challah Baking, Mock Wedding, Ashkefardic night and the list of trips and recreational events just keeps going, But there is also helping out in the kitchen for Shabbat, Cafe and Jam nights, and visiting the elderly once a week. Actually, what do you think Shabbat and holidays are like at Chabad? Or our game room? Or just hanging out in one of our many lounges with new and old friends.

Q: I am interested in Social Action and Leadership, what can you tell me?

A: Boy, do we have good news for you! Chabad is fueled by the ideas and hard work of students. We have place on our student governing board for anyone who has great ideas or wants to contribute to our robust Jewish life or both.

Social action? How about our annual blood drive ( the largest on campus), our bone marrow drives, our annual Holiday Toy Drive to benefit kids with cancer, our annual Fashion Show to benefit women with breast and ovarian cancer?

How about a weekly visit to the elderly and individuals with special needs through the Maasim Tovim foundation or helping out to get Shabbat ready for a few hundred? Get your sleeves rolled up, this is your destination.

Q: So how much time do I have to dedicate to Chabad activities?

A: As little or as much as you want. Chabad is like a big pool. Some people swim in the deep end, some in the shallow, some just want to stick their toes in and some want to sit pool side. People also change their level of involvement from semester to semester. Come to Shabbat dinner, or an event and stay as long as you want. Take it from there… If you wish to become very active and take on a leadership role, boy can we give you opportunities!

Q: But wait!! How much does it cost?

A: Nothing! Just bring yourself and lots of friends!

Q: Who is who at Chabad?

A: Click here for the "who's who"

Q: If I am checking out Binghamton and want to come visit can you help me?

A: We highly recommend you come visit for a weekend and see Binghamton for yourself. You are most welcome to join our Shabbat services and meals and we can help you find a place to stay, click here for more info

Q: If my parents want to come visit where can they stay?

A: Click here for lodging options near campus and Chabad

Q: What does Chabad mean?

A: Chabad is a philosophy, organization and worldwide movement. The word Chabad is an acronym for Chachmah, Binah, Daas, which means wisdom, understanding, and knowledge. The idea is to provide Jewish education, inspiration and experiences. While Chabad began in the small city of Lubavitch in White Russia, Chabad Centers can be found in every part of the world and in each one of those places Chabad is doing everything it can to help Jews be Jewish.

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